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just to be curious... (Tamil Nadu, India)

Meenakshi Temple, India

The Meenakshi Temple, located in the ancient city of Madurai, is one of the most impressive Indian Hindu temples.

Rebuilt in the 14th century and renovated in the 17th century, the structure is formed by 14 gopurams (gatehouse towers) adorned with several (about a thousand) colourful sculpted pillars, celebrating the Princess Meenakshi and her marriage to Shiva.

Every evening it is represented the symbolic ceremony of the sexual union: Shiva, carried on a silver palanquin, is washed, perfumed, incensed and then taken to Parvati's room.

The temple has been declared best Swachh Iconic Place (SIP) in India on 2017 and is one of the main Shivaism pilgrimage destinations and attracts thousands of visitors a day.

just to be curious... (the White Desert, Egypt)


The Sahara el Beyda, well known as the White Desert, is one of the most spectacular deserts in the world. Its chalk rock formations, after millions of years of wind and sand erosion, has bizarre shapes like, for example, the rock named "The chicken and the mushroom".

The area is a National Park located about 50 km North of the town of Farafra, Egypt.

The desert was also the location of the music video of the song Echoes, the first single released by the British rock band Klaxons, from their second studio album, Surfing the Void.

Unfortunately, since military and Islamist militants presence, the area is not safe, though local agencies organize trips for tourists.

just to be curious... (Prayer Flags, Tibet)

Tibet Prayer Flags

The colourful flags, originated with the ancient Tibetan religion bön and typical of the mountain areas of Tibet and Himalayas are not ornaments or even simple flags: they spread wisdom, peace, strength and wellness to all living beings.

Horizontal prayer flags are called lung-ta (small and rectangular or square shape) and vertical flags are called darchor (rectangular and large, attached to vertical posts).

Their high altitude position is not accidental: the blow of the wind touches the prayers printed on the flags and the air is purified by the mantra, spreading all the virtues in space. 

The five traditional colours are placed in a specific order from left: blue, white, red, green, and yellow. They represent the five elements, which balanced, produces harmony and health:

  • blue: sky 
  • white: wind
  • red: fire
  • green: water
  • yellow: earth

Tibetans continually arrange new flags alongside the oldies, symbolizing a welcoming of new life.

Since they are sacred, the flags should be treated with respect: they should not be placed on the ground or used for other purposes.